In-Season “Stay Green”

December 2021 FARM INSIGHT

Reeling from fertilizer sticker shock? In some areas, fertilizer prices have skyrocketed more than 300%. Delivery times are anyone’s best guess. What’s your next move? Plant less corn next spring? Cut back on fertilizer to save money? Critical mistakes are easy to make at times like this. Here are 3 things you should never do if you want to control your fertilizer costs in 2022.

BarnTender

BarnTender

Quicker Composting, Better Fly Control:
BarnTender Delivers Chemical-Free Solutions

By-O-reg+

By-O-reg+

Gut Check: Wisconsin Dairy Uses Milk Replacer Supplement to Boost Calves’ Microbiome

At-Plant “Jump Start Yield”

Fertilizer

Nitrogen fertilizer prices are shattering records. Supply chain challenges are getting worse. Inflation and shortages are becoming the norm. What’s your next move? Plant less corn next spring? Cut back on fertilizer to save money? It’s time to control the controllables on your farm and get the soil microbes going so you can access the free fertilizer that’s already in your fields. Free fertilizer? Yep, you’ve got it. Click here to learn how to maximize it.

Microbes, Manure and Better Water Quality

Beneficial Microbes

When was the last time you heard anyone outside of agriculture praise farmers’ efforts to improve water quality? Livestock producers, in particular, often get blamed for water quality challenges. While many farmers have adopted more eco-friendly farming practices to protect water quality, there’s still a missing link. Managing microbes is key to putting the right biology into manure. Click here to learn 10 ways microbe management makes nutrients readily available, limits nutrient leaching, controls odor and even makes more room in your manure pits.

Residue Management “Second Harvest”

With the threat of rising fertilizer prices, it’s essential to maximize the free fertilizer you have in your fields already. Where’s that fertilizer, you ask? It’s locked up in your corn residue. Tough, “super stalks” are often part of raising insect-resistant, high-yielding corn with modern seed genetics. The stalks’ slow decomposition, however, can create big headaches, especially if you plant continuous corn or are a no-tiller.
“I’ve seen stalks lay out there for two and a half years or more,” says Josh Knapke, a 4th generation Ohio farmer who raises corn, soybeans, wheat, hogs and cattle.
Simply slicing up corn residue and tilling it into the soil doesn’t speed up decomposition. Knapke has learned that it’s vital to bring the biology back into the soil to break down crop residue efficiently, boost soil health and unlock nutrients in the residue to nourish next year’s crop. Click here to see how residue management after harvest has become a key tool Knapke and his brother use to build soil health and boost yield potential.

Stalk Rot

Stalk Rot

If drought conditions hit your area this summer, there’s a good chance stalk rot might be lurking in your fields. How do you know if your corn crop is at higher risk for lodging this harvest? Click here to put your crop to the test and prioritize which fields to harvest first.

Fall Armyworms

Fall Armyworms

If you grow small grains like wheat, alfalfa, hay or cover crops, there could be big trouble lurking in your fields right now. Click here to determine if you’re at threshold levels and how to prevent armyworms from destroying your crop.